Graham Colton Goes Green on His Latest Tour

Singer-songwriter and Oklahoma City native Graham Colton released his latest record, Pacific Coast Eyes Vol. 2, this past October. This new volume of Pacific Coast Eyes includes three new tracks, “Hold Onto My Heart,” “My Resignation,” and “Wide Open Inside,” as well as alternate versions of three previously released tracks.

In support of his latest album, Colton partnered up with CNGnow as a way to advocate for the use of compressed natural gas versus diesel fuel. In addition to driving a CNG-fueled vehicle throughout the tour, the singer-songwriter has been documenting his experience on CNGnow.com.

I recently had the opportunity to speak with Colton, who shared with me his decision to embark on a green tour, what keeps him motivated while writing new material, and the benefits of being an independent artist.

What was the inspiration behind doing this green “Go Natural” tour?

Well, I think it started with just the ever-changing landscape of not only the music business, but the touring business, which is how I made my living and connected with my fans for the last almost-eight years now. It’s really hard to not only tour the country by myself, let alone with a band: to pack everyone in the van, trailer, bus, train, plane, whatever you want to call it.

It really started with me trying to investigate ways that I can not only tour the country, but [do so] cost-effectively. And once I started researching, I started thinking about the environmental aspect, and I came across the CNGnow.com website and what natural gas can do for not only our environment and our alliance with foreign oil, and, really, my pocketbook. It’s been kind of a perfect marriage of the two things.

Continue reading Graham Colton Goes Green on His Latest Tour

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Stream Tim Halperin’s Debut Album, Rise and Fall

I know sometimes when it comes to new artists people can be hesitant about buying an entire album before hearing it, myself included. However, when awesome artists, like Tim Halperin, stream their new album for all to listen to, I think it’s more than worth it to check it out! 

Take a listen to Tim’s debut album, Rise and Fall, below!

Aaaand if you’re diggin’ what you hear on Rise and Fall, I encourage you to head over to iTunes and pick up a digital copy!

If you happen to want my two cents on Tim’s album, check out my review!

For more information on Tim Halperin: Website/Facebook/Twitter/Tumblr

Music Review >> Tim Halperin – ‘Rise and Fall’

The day after his American Idol contract was up, season 10 alum Tim Halperin released his debut full-length album, Rise and Fall, on September 27.

Halperin began working on the album prior to his Idol journey in August of 2010. Working with producer, Jordan Critz, Halperin selected 13 tracks that he felt gave a well-rounded representation of himself.

“With this record, because it’s my first full-length album, I wanted to make sure that it was the most me. That it had songs on it that I felt like best represented who I am, not only as a songwriter, but as a person,” he explained to me during our interview earlier this week.

I think Halperin definitely accomplished that goal. Rise and Fall is comprised of songs about life, love, and heartbreak.

His first single, “The Last Song,” is currently in the top ten on the Singer/Songwriters Songs chart on iTunes. Halperin told me this past June that the tune was one of the first songs recorded for Rise and Fall about a year and a half ago.

“It just turned out really well, and I think that that song gives people a good picture of who I am, and also that my music is very honest and straightforward. I like to throw all my emotions on the table, because I think people can relate best to honest music,” he said.

Continue reading Music Review >> Tim Halperin – ‘Rise and Fall’

Meet Jessie Frye

Jessie Frye describes her music as “Oscar Wilde climbing into a piano and drinking lots of espresso,” whereas I would describe the Texas native’s music as a refreshing addition to today’s music scene that is reminiscent of The Cranberries mixed in with PJ Harvey and Liz Phair, along with a dash of Sara Bareilles for good measure.

Frye’s first step into the musical world was when she was eight years old and started taking voice lessons. At around the age of 11 or 12, she began piano lessons. For Frye, it was right after she started playing piano that she realized that she was meant to be a creator and make music.

While growing up in Dallas, Texas, Frye listened to the music that that would shape her as an artist, including acts such as The Cure, Tori Amos, Michael Jackson and the pre-rapping days of Madonna. Also, as a huge fan of literature, she counts Oscar Wilde as a huge creative influence. She credits him, saying, “His outlook and his passion and his philosophy really inspired the core beliefs that I have about art.”

In 2008, Frye released her debut EP, The Delve, which she describes as having that “DIY charm,” and that “it’s very innocent, it’s very organic and raw.”

At age 22, the now Denton-based Frye is fresh off her third turn of performing at SXSW and is gearing up to release her second EP, Fireworks Child, this week.

Last month, I spoke with Frye over the phone to talk about performing live, her new EP, Fireworks Child, and her goals for the future. So, without further ado, meet Jessie Frye.

Around what age did you start writing music?

Well, like 11 years old. But, they were horrible, obviously. I feel like you have to feel things out and write some really private bad stuff before you start writing the good stuff. I know good is relative, but when you’re 11, your songwriting probably isn’t as polished as when you’re 20 or something like that.

As you progressed into writing songs that you would go on to perform, where was the inspiration coming from? 

Experiences. I always try to think when I’m writing songs, I think a lot of people think, well, this is about love or this is about a relationship, but for me I try to describe it. Not so much that it’s storytelling, but it’s abstract at the same time, so you take whatever you want from it; like using metaphors, not using blatant sentences in your lyrics. To me, lyrics are a really, really important thing, and no matter how good the music is, I can’t listen to it if your lyrics are dumb. You know, I just can’t do it. I spend a lot more time on lyric writing than I spend on actually arranging the music.

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